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The Rise And Fall Of The E-book

July 11th, 2017

First, thanks to Walter for last week’s blog. I couldn’t agree more with what he has to say. Winning a writing competition has lots of advantages: the prize (whether cash or some other goodie), the confidence it gives you (let’s be honest, we all like our egos massaging at times), publication, the promotion you get as a writer and, of course, the chance to meet famous authors!

There’s also the fact that making yourself write something new for a competition and then polishing it until you know it’s the very best you can do is wonderful discipline for any writer. And this is one of the main reasons why, here at Writers Bureau, we hold a number of competitions each year: short story, flash fiction, poetry and limerick. So, here’s a quick reminder that you’ve still time to have some fun and win a cash prize by entering our latest Limerick Competition. The closing date is 31st July… so it’s creeping up on you fast! Read the rest of this entry »




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Bookshops Rise Again

February 12th, 2016

Bookstore-Indie-blogA few years ago bookshops were in decline and everyone was telling us that paper books were finished, but it now seems to be going the other way.

Over in China dangdang.com, a huge online retailer, is planning to open 1000 new bookshops across the country, following the launch of its first outlet in Changsha City, Hunan.

After 20 years of online sales, Amazon opened its first real-world bookstore recently in Seattle’s University Village. It’s stocked with 6000 books at the same price as they can be bought on the website and I suspect that the roll-out will continue if it proves profitable. Read the rest of this entry »




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World Book Day’s Here Again

February 13th, 2015

windsor-castle-blogAs usual, thanks to Nicki for last Friday’s blog post. It got me looking through our tutor records and it’s amazing how many of them are ex-students. Students that have been successful and have then approached us to see if they could work with the next ‘generation’ of would-be writers. And the reason that we have so many is that it works!

Because they have studied with us they are familiar with the course and how we are organised. But more importantly, they know what it feels like to be a student – the trepidation of sending off your first assignment and wondering what the feedback will be like; the apprehension of making your first submission to a magazine…  So, they can tailor their feedback accordingly. Read the rest of this entry »




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Books Change Things

October 13th, 2014

Top-Ten-blogWhat are your favourite books? That’s a tough one. How about this – What are the books that changed things for you? The ones that made you think about yourself, or the world in a different way?

Here’s my top ten (whittled down from a short-list of some thirty-odd). Read the rest of this entry »




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First Impressions Count!

July 23rd, 2014

Whether it’s a short story or a novel you’re working on, your opening paragraph is what will set you apart from other writers. If you’re sending work to an editor, agent or a competition then it could well be the only part of your story they actually read!

A strong opening is the key to getting your reader interested enough to finish off the story; so don’t rush it. You’ll reap the benefits later on if you spend a little time and care crafting the perfect opening paragraph.

To really grab your reader’s attention, you might want to consider starting your story ‘in medias res’ or in the middle of the action. You don’t always have to set the scene before something exciting happens, and starting off in the middle of an action-packed scene will immediately make your reader ask questions. As far as action goes, the bigger the event the more likely it is to hook your readers’ attention – so don’t be afraid to go for something shocking!

Once your action scene is over, you can allow your main character to reflect on the events leading up to that scene, slowly telling the story and answering those questions. There’s nothing wrong with starting a story with a little mystery – just make sure you solve it at the end!

If your talents lie more in descriptive writing than action-heavy scenes then you might want to use your skills to draw your reader in right at the start. When setting the scene for your story, make sure to use all of your senses and try to come up with something a little out of the ordinary. We all know that you’ll be able to see trees in the middle of a forest, but what about the smells and sounds? Extra details like this will create a lasting image for your readers, and you can use your words to create a multi-sensory picture to grab their attention.

Finally, as we’ve mentioned before, a short story or a novel is nothing without a memorable main character, so opening with a thought or some dialogue can be a great way to introduce them. Doing this places your character as the most important thing about the story, and it’s also a handy way to sneak in a short physical description without having to dedicate a new paragraph to it. If you decide to do this, then choose your words carefully. Think about the kind of language your character would use, if they might use any slang words or if they have any kind of accent or dialect. Try, as much as possible, to give information about your character through their speech without having to explicitly state it – remember “show” don’t “tell”. In a short story especially, this will save you precious words to use on advancing the plot.

A good opening can take hours of time and effort to create, so try different things and keep making changes until you’re happy with it. Trust us, you’ll be glad you spent the time on it when you get your first acceptance letter!




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