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Poetic Payoff

August 9th, 2019

Trying to write poetry can be satisfying even for a beginner. Unlike many sports and other hobbies, the exercise costs not a bean, and – whilst the pen may be mightier than the sword – it poses no threat to life or limb.

Poetry is easier to describe than to define, but it tends to be more expressive than the language we use every day, often following patterns of rhyme and metre, adding musicality and even sometimes a dimension beyond the ordinary.

I personally like poems that make a pertinent or amusing observation or tell a story or that somehow seem to strike a chord. I also like them to have sounds that appeal to the ear, perhaps with some kind of pattern or rhythm as well as rhymes or half rhymes. These preferences may be somewhat reactionary, since much modern poetry does not rhyme or seem to have any clear rhythm. Read the rest of this entry »




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Writing Poetry – The Creative Process

July 12th, 2019

The Chinese poet Li Po (Tang Dynasty) said, “Writing poetry is like being alive twice.”  The experience of writing is individual to each poet and yet when one researches and reads about the poets one admires and aspires towards, there is often a common thread.  Every poet no matter when or where they are in the world draws on the experience they accumulate during the different stages of their life and the environment they find themselves in. And this shapes the way in which a poem is developed.  It becomes the defining factor in the texture of their work. Read the rest of this entry »




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Engaging Learners Through Writing For Fun

October 19th, 2018

Most confident writers (I’m guessing the majority of people reading this) take these skills for granted. So it might surprise you that approximately one in five adults in the UK have less than functional literacy and struggle with tasks such as filling in forms, reading instructions or supplying correct information at the Doctors’.

Social Media often sees negative comments regarding spelling or misuse of English, with the implication that such mistakes suggest the writer is stupid and their opinions, therefore, of less value.  Poor spellers seem to be fair game. But in fact, the problem is seldom generated by stupidity but usually by interrupted schooling: elderly people removed from school to work or care for younger siblings, middle aged folk who were never identified as Dyslexic or had periods of absence due to illness, to teenagers who have dodged school or moved home frequently.  Of course, statistically speaking, there are strong links between other socio-economic factors and low literacy skills but affected people are not a ‘type’.  Sadly, more young people than ever are now leaving school with inadequate literacy skills. Read the rest of this entry »




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What’s YOUR Motivation?

May 18th, 2018

First, thanks to Vicki for last week’s post. I think she’s right when she says that nearly everyone who has had a burning desire to write probably remembers the motivation that first prompted them to pursue their dream.

But for some people, it’s maintaining that motivation when things don’t seem to be going right that’s a problem. Your cherished novel has been rejected…and rejected…and rejected. That fascinating article about your trip to the saffron fields of Morocco just doesn’t seem to be catching the eye of a travel editor. Your carefully crafted short story hasn’t been short-listed in yet another competition.  At some point, any writer can start to feel that perhaps they just haven’t got what it takes. Read the rest of this entry »




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Limerick Competition Open For Entries

April 20th, 2018

First, thanks to Claire for last week’s blog. For me, it demonstrates two things. First, that writing isn’t an easy option. You really have to work at it if you hope to succeed. And second, if you feel you’re working on something good, you should follow your own path and not just go with the flow.

We’ve been hearing for ages that novels should be a minimum of 70,000 words, or they are hard to market, and that novellas and collections of short stories don’t sell unless they are written by someone famous. But Claire’s experience disproves this – they will sell if you persevere and find the right way to get your message to the reading public.

While we’re on the subject of novellas, I’ve just read that ‘Nightflyers’, by George RR Martin is being turned into a ten-part TV series to debut on Syfy (and Netflix) later this year. I’m a great fan of Game of Thrones and can’t wait for the final series to be ready. But I have to admit that since production outran the actual writing of the novels episodes do seem more run-of-the-mill and less riveting. Read the rest of this entry »




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