27 Years of Success!

Tel: 0161 819 9922

Reading Around The World

July 10th, 2020

First, thanks to Esther for last week’s blog. She is, of course, absolutely right. If you want to make it as a writer  then you have to be prepared to persevere, and you can’t sit back waiting for results. You’ve got to keep sending work out – the more you get out there, the greater your chances of success.

When the ‘black lives matter’ campaign started I noticed that quite a few publishers and websites started suggesting lists of BAME authors. I had a look at some of them and felt that quite a few were little more than a token gesture. So, I’ve been thinking about some of my favourite authors – ones that I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend – and here they are. There’s no one on this list that I haven’t read at least one of their books and enjoyed it. I just hope you get as much pleasure if you decide to try them. Incidentally, they’re not in any kind of order of preference.

Rohinton Mistry ‘A Fine Balance’ was recommended to me by numerous people and it really lived up to expectations. But be prepared to shed a tear! Read the rest of this entry »




Comments Off on Reading Around The World

Quest Fiction

June 5th, 2020

An anonymous critic recently claimed that all stories are “quest stories”. The critic  did not enlarge on the claim and my immediate reaction was to doubt this and like most people I could think of one of two novels which don’t involve a search or quest.

On the other hand, I would have to agree that the quest is a central issue in a great many stories and novels.

There has been a tendency to think of the quest story as just a genre for children’s fiction. The classic, well-known example is “Treasure Island” by R L Stevenson. The whole story is based around the quest or search for treasure by a number of parties. In “The Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy is literally blown away and she can only find her way home by searching for the Emerald City at the end of the yellow brick road. Read the rest of this entry »




Comments Off on Quest Fiction

Fail To Plan, Plan To Fail

September 6th, 2019

When you make the scary decision to call yourself a writer, it is natural to glean as much as you can about writing, either through formal study, research or a combination of the two. Invariably, you will discover numerous ways to construct your story, how you’re supposed to plan and know exactly what the narrative will look like before you start writing. Then, there is the reality.

The Idea

Ideas manifest themselves in a variety of ways and can come from anywhere at any time. Personally, I am often blindsided by an idea when there is no immediate access to writing materials, like in the shower or whilst driving. When this happens I start ‘singing’ the idea out loud so I don’t forget it. The beginning of a new piece is an exciting stage, but it is rarely a fully formed idea. At this point you are likely to have a fragment or several fragments around a theme, a location, a piece of dialogue, a character, or a scene. Read the rest of this entry »




Comments Off on Fail To Plan, Plan To Fail

Getting To Know You…

August 2nd, 2019

First, thanks to Marisa for last week’s thoughtful post. We all know that when we’re writing for children we need to be particularly sensitive to their needs – and (let’s be honest) sensitive to the perceptions of the adults and teachers who are often the ones who buy the books for them!

On the other hand we can be dismissive of teenagers – they often come across as inscrutable, worldly wise beyond their years and Teflon coated. But, their attitude is often just that – a thin veneer. And you’ve got to take that into account if you want to write for them successfully.

So, if you do decide that this is the market for you, how should you approach it? Read the rest of this entry »




Comments Off on Getting To Know You…

Five Tips for Writing a Psychological Thriller

August 3rd, 2018

Psychological thrillers are riding high at the moment and vying with romance to be the most popular fiction genre with readers. Think of all those books with ‘Girl’ in the title and the never-ending stream of ‘noir’ novels and TV series, especially from Scandinavia. This fashion of readers liking to be scared shows no signs of letting up. If you fancy creating a dark read of your own, here are five top tips for writing a psychological thriller: Read the rest of this entry »




Comments Off on Five Tips for Writing a Psychological Thriller

subscribe
About The Author: Diana Nadin

Blog Home

 
Institute of Training and Occupational Learning

Bookmark and Share