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Creative Characterisation

November 28th, 2016

reading-blogFirst, thanks to Colin for last week’s blog. As he points out, there really is nothing new under the sun and today we’re still following the same ‘rules’ as writers were centuries ago. And they’re still helping us to write successful and gripping stories.

Long after readers have forgotten many other features of your book or short story, it will be your characters who will live on in their minds.  And the stronger, the more striking your characters are, the more memorable they’ll be.

So, here are some tips for ensuring that your characters are unforgettable:

  1. Aim to create individuals who leap off the page, exuding energy and creating dramatic impact. They must be more exciting, and more attention grabbing, than the people we meet in our normal workaday existence.

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Lessons from the Past for Fiction Writers

November 22nd, 2016

colin's-book-blogLittle read today, Somerset Maugham was one of the most popular and bestselling authors of novels and short stories in the 20th century. He once challenged himself to write a short story about a totally good man. It is probably his least successful story.

There is a good reason for this. While most people are not villainous, neither are they perfect – or totally good. And characters in fiction are more interesting if they have weaknesses and, occasionally, are very bad. They don’t come much nastier than Hannibal Lector in Thomas Harrison’s The Silence of the Lambs, yet the character and the novel have been immensely popular. Regrettably, perhaps, goodness can be boring. Read the rest of this entry »




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Managing Your Social Media

November 11th, 2016

social-media-blogFirst, thanks to Phil for last week’s blog, it’s great to have him as one of the team working in the office.

And he’s absolutely right. One of the best things about working for the Writers Bureau (apart from the Friday cream cakes) is that we’re dealing with students from all over the world. I love reading through assignments, it’s like having a window on the world. Not the world you see in glossy travel brochures, but the world of real people, leading real lives.

Another interesting, but odd, experience is when you get a student writing about a place that you know well. A lady recently described a park very close to where I live and which I visit quite often. It’s just an ordinary, municipal park but I think it’s tranquil and relaxing and she obviously felt the same way. I got a little jolt of pleasure to think that someone else obviously sees it in the same way that I do. Read the rest of this entry »




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Around The World With The Writers Bureau

November 4th, 2016

WorldHi folks,

It’s been a while since I wrote anything here. So, how y’all keeping? Everybody well?

Things have changed a bit for me. Most notably – our youngest has started high school (and, fingers crossed, he seems to be alright). So, with a view to keeping the wolf from the door, I’ve said farewell to my days as a house-husband and started work here at the Writers Bureau – in the office.

Now, I’ve never worked in an office before, and maybe in a couple of months the novelty will wear off. But for now, I’m enjoying it. They’re a nice crew, the Writers Bureau team. We all celebrate each others birthdays, everyone brings treats back from their holidays, and we have cream cakes on Fridays, so I’m having to watch my waist-line. Read the rest of this entry »




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In A Class Of Her Own

October 28th, 2016

different-class-blogOn Friday I went to listen to Joanne Harris (author of Chocolat, amongst other well-known novels) talking about, and reading from, her latest book Different Class.

But it was the question and answer session at the end that I found most interesting. Someone asked her how long it took her to write her books. The answer was anything from three months to five years! The reason she gave for this was that sometimes she ran out of inspiration; she had to have a break while she did some research; or she had to wait for the pieces of a plot to fall into place in her subconscious. What she stressed, though, was that she didn’t feel that any of this time was wasted as she always had more than one project on the go and when a particular piece of work wasn’t going well she turned to something else. A sensible approach for any writer. Read the rest of this entry »




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About The Author: Diana Nadin

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